January 19, 2020
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Bathurst won’t seek judicial review of arbitration decision

Bathurst won’t seek judicial review of arbitration decision

New Brunswick·New

The City of Bathurst won’t seek a judicial review of an arbitrator’s decision last month that found no wrongdoing by two officers involved in the 2015 shooting death of Michel Vienneau. 

Arbitrator found no wrongdoing in death of Michel Vienneau

Shane Magee · CBC News ·

Bathurst Police Force Constables Mathieu Boudreau, left, and Patrick Bulger, centre, will resume their duties later this month with the police force. (Shane Magee/CBC )

The City of Bathurst won’t seek a judicial review of an arbitrator’s decision last month that found no wrongdoing by two officers involved in the 2015 shooting death of Michel Vienneau. 

The city announced the decision in a news release Tuesday afternoon. 

Constables Mathieu Boudreau and Patrick Bulger each faced five counts of code of conduct violations under the Police Act. 

Arbitrator Joël Michaud’s 58-page written decision issued Dec. 24 says he did not find the officers violated the code of conduct. The city had previously not commented on the decision and said it was closely examining the ruling. It had 90 days to decide whether to seek a judicial review. 

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Vienneau, a 51-year-old Tracadie businessman, was killed Jan. 12, 2015 outside the Bathurst train station. He was coming home from watching a hockey game in Montreal with his fiancée, Annick Basque. 

Michel Vienneau, 51, of Tracadie, had come off a Via Rail train from Montreal and was in his car when he was shot and killed by police. (Submitted by Nicolas Vienneau)

Undercover police officers, including Boudreau and Bulger, were waiting for him at the station based on anonymous Crime Stoppers tips he was trafficking drugs by train. 

The tips turned out to be false. 

Both officers had been suspended with pay from the police force pending the outcome of the arbitration hearing. 

The statement says both officers will begin their reintegration process on Jan. 20, 2020, which will include internal administrative and operational elements, as well as external recertification components.

About the Author

Shane Magee is a Moncton-based reporter for CBC.

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